2013-2014 ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What values define America?
 
MARKING PERIOD 1 ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How do our time and place affect our thinking?
 
Grade Level Specific Understandings:

       About Essential Questions

  1. The way we view the world may change as our individual contexts change.
  2. Time and place influence both the reader and writer’s beliefs.
  3. Time and place affect behavior and action in both art and life.
  4. All art or literature occurs in multiple contexts, including the physical, the temporal, and the psycho-social dimensions.  (No art occurs in a vacuum.)
  5. Learning about different historical and geographical contexts help us understand ideologies that may be different from our own.

Lesson 1:

Students will be able to --

·        Receive their seating assignments.

·        Review the course syllabus.

·        Examine the components of the teacher page.

·        Understand the requirements of the summer reading assessment.

·        View the Malala Yousafzai BBC video clip.

·        Reflection: What are three things that struck you about Malala Yousafzai's experience?  Aside from education, list three VALUES (principles, standards, judgments of what is important) that Yousafzai defends.

·        Engage in a whip discussion to briefly share either what struck them or the value Yousafzai defends.

·        Quick Write: List 3-5 values that are unique to the United States.

·        Share their American values, and narrow the list to three values. Partners should be prepared to develop ONE value and share it with the class.

Lesson 2:
Students will be able to --
-- take the summer reading assessment.

Lesson 3:
Students will be able to --
DO NOW:

a.  Take out homework for submission.

b.  Answer "Upon the Burning of Our House" questions.

·  Review "Upon the Burning of Our House" questions and connect the concepts of the poem back to the Marking Period 1 essential question.

·  Underline the most important aspect of their paragraphs (homework), and share their values with the class.

·  Engage in a meditation exercise re: Carl Jung's concept of the collective unconscious to better understand the meaning of symbols.
 
Lesson 4:
Students will be able to --
-- take notes and engage in a discussion on allegory.
-- understand the allegory and symbolism of early New England gravestones as a model for reading "Young Goodman Brown."
-- interpret two early New England gravestones. 
-- sketch a gravestone for Young Goodman Brown that includes an appropriate epitaph and symbols.
 
Lesson 5:
Students will be able to --
-- engage in a whip discussion to share their Young Goodman Brown epitaphs and symbols.
-- work in cooperative groups on the allegorical interpretations of the characters, objects, settings, and actions in "Young Goodman Brown." 
-- begin group presentations.
 
Lesson 6:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check quiz on The Scarlet Letter, Chapters 1-4.
-- finish the "Young Goodman Brown" group presentations.
-- discuss and take notes on American Romanticism to contextualize The Scarlet Letter.
-- screen the "Sandwich Board Kids" segment of ABC's "What Would You Do?" as a connection to The Scarlet Letter.
-- discuss the crime and punishment represented in the video and compare it to Hester Prynne's predicament.
 
Lesson 7:
Students will be able to --
-- describe the relationship between Hester Prynne and Roger Chillingworth up to and including Chapter 6 (as a Do Now/journal).
-- discuss their journal writing.
-- read aloud and discuss specific passages in Chapter 3: "The Recognition" to expound on the meaning of Chillingworth's transformation.
 
Lesson 8:
Students will be able to --
-- write three images and one value represented in Rev. Jonathan Edwards's "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God."
-- Examine the cover art of The Scarlet Letter and discuss the insight it adds to our knowledge of the text.
-- compare Hester Knocking at Mercy's Door to Christ Knocking at Heart's Door.
-- begin screening Dr. Ralph Greene's reenactment of Rev. Jonathan Edwards's "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God."
-- observe the forensic elements of Dr. Greene's performance and assess its effectiveness in delivering the message of the sermon.
 
Lesson 9:
Students will be able to --
-- write a journal entry that responds to the following prompt (Do Now):
> Describe the Pearl's personality.
> Describe Pearl's relationship with:
a.  Hester
b.  Chillingworth
c.  Gov. Bellingham
d.  Rev. Dimmesdale
-- discuss their journal writing.
-- examine the Madonna and Child painting by Raphael as a model used by Nathaniel Hawthorne in describing the relationship between Hester and Pearl (allegory).
-- discuss the images and values of Rev. Jonathan Edwards's "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" in conversation with Rev. Dimmesdale's approach to his ministry.
 
Lesson 10:
Students will be able to --
-- assess Dimmesdale as a minister.  Do Now/Journal: How would Rev. Jonathan Edwards evaluate Dimmesdale as a minister?  Refer to passages in the novel and the sermon to support your ideas.
-- discuss their journal writing.
 
Lesson 11:
Students will be able to --
-- write a journal entry on the following topic: Describe the relationship between Dimmesdale and Chillingworth.  Provide textual evidence to support your ideas.
-- discuss their journal writing.
-- screen the film, starring Demi Moore, to reinforce and visualize the novel.
 
Lesson 12:
Students will be able to --
-- take notes on the Marking Period One understandings.
-- work in cooperative groups on how each anchor and The Scarlet Letter address the group's assigned understanding.  They must provide evidence from the anchor texts and The Scarlet Letter to suppor their points.
 
Lesson 13:
Students will be able to --
-- present their group work to the class, which must include notes projected on the LCD screen.
 
Lesson 14:
Students will be able to --
-- engage in a second reading of The Scarlet Letter, Chapter 13.
-- engage in a literary analysis of Chapter 13, using the "Hawthorne and Hester" handout.
 
Lesson 15:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading comprehension quiz on The Scarlet Letter, Chapters 17-18.
-- understand the requirements of the personal narrative/themed autobiography.
-- independently read "Still Puritan After All These Years" by Matthew Hutson and highlight the salient points.
-- engage in a class discussion about the Hutson article.
 
Lesson 16:
Students will be able to --
-- Screen the film, Easy A, to make contemporary connections to The Scarlet Letter.
-- discuss how successfully the movie remains true to the spirit of Hawthorne in a modern setting (return to Marking Period One essential question and understandings).
 
Lesson 17:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss the final chapters of The Scarlet Letter.
-- review the study guide for the Scarlet Letter final test.
-- play the Scarlet Letter Jeopardy! review game as a formative assessment to prepare for the test.
 
Lesson 18:
Students will be able to --
-- take the Scarlet Letter final test.
 
Lesson 19:
Students will be able to --
-- work independently on their personal narrative/themed autobiography drafts in the computer lab.
-- engage in mini individual writing conferences with me on a specific area regarding their drafts.
 
Lesson 20:
Students will be able to --
-- write a journal entry that connects "Half-Hanged Mary" to The Scarlet Letter and explicates a stanza they find shocking or intriguing.
-- discuss "Half-Hanged Mary" in conversation with the Puritan-themed texts that they have read.
 
Lesson 21:
Students will be able to --
-- takes notes and engage in a discussion on the Puritans and the Salem Witch Trials as a context for reading The Crucible.
-- engage in a close reading of Thompkins H. Matteson's painting, The Trial of George Jacobs, August 5, 1692.
-- discuss what the details/action in the painting suggest about the nature of a "crucible" and the mass hysteria that swept Salem during the Salem Witch Trials.

Lesson 22:
Students will be able to --
-- screen the introduction of the Crucible film to further discuss the onset of mass hysteria in Salem.
-- take notes on their observations and discuss their insights.
-- discuss/brainstorm what they know about terrorism.
-- understand the requirements of the "Acts of Terror" group work.
-- engage in group work in preparation for oral presentations about the acts of terror that have occurred in America.
 
Lesson 23:
Students will be able to --
-- continue the group work in preparation for oral presentations about the acts of terror that have occurred in America.
 
Lesson 24:
Students will be able to --
-- present their "Acts of Terror" group work.
-- create a US Terrorism timeline on the bulletin board to help them visually connect the events.
-- write a concise definition of terrorism on an index card, based on the presentations.
-- focus on how the Salem Witch Trials can be considered an event of terror.
-- begin reading aloud The Crucible, Act One, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 
Lesson 25:
Students will be able to --

-- screen the introductory scene ofthe Crucible film, starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder.

-- identify the central conflictusing evidence from the film.

-- discuss their observations as awhole class.

-- discuss the causes of masshysteria and scapegoating.

 
Lesson 26:
Students will be able to --

-- discuss the first half of The Crucible, Act One.

-- continue screening the film to reinforce and visualize the text.

 
Lesson 27:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check quiz on The Crucible, Act One.

-- discuss the American values at stake in The Crucible, Act One.

-- begin acting out The Crucible, Act Two, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and takenotes.

 
Lesson 28:
Students will be able to --

-- discuss McCarthyism, hysteria, tragedy, and staging to expound on the critical issues espoused in The Crucible.

 
Lesson 29:
Students will be able to --
-- continue acting out The Crucible, Act Two, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.  
 
Lesson 30:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check quiz on The Crucible, Act Two.
-- begin acting out The Crucible, Act Three, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 
Lesson 31:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Crucible, Act Three.
-- begin acting out The Crucible, Act Four, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 
Lesson 32:
Students will be able to --
-- discus The Crucible, Act Four.
-- discuss screen key scenes in the film to reinforce and visualize the text.
 
Lesson 33:
Students will be able to --
-- take the final test on The Crucible.          
 

MARKING PERIOD TWO ESSENTIAL QUESTION:

 ·         Is "liberty and justice" attainable for all?

 ·         How can we balance everyone's rights?

 Grade Level Specific Understandings:

 About Essential Questions

 1.    There are different notions of freedom, liberty, and justice.

 2.    Culture defines liberty and justice.

 3.    Authors respond to and are informed by notions about liberty and justice in their works.

 4.    Nations are governed by notions of liberty and justice.

 5.    There is an American tradition and heritage that emphasizes liberty and justice.

 

Lesson 1:

Students will be able to --

-- write a journal entry about what it means to "transcend" something."

-- discuss their journal entries, while noting the salient points on the blackboard.

-- discuss the transcendental concepts of Tao or the Over-soul.

-- read the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu, Poems 1 and 23.

-- discuss the categories that emerge from the Tao Te Ching in developing a working definition of transcendentalism.

-- screen selected excerpts from the film, Seven Years in Tibet, to reinforce the concepts that inspired Emerson and Thoreau's development of American transcendentalism. The students must note specific scenes that reflect the unique aspects of Tibetan values.

-- discuss their observations.

 

Lesson 2:

Students will be able to --

-- understand the requirements of the Declaration of Independence rhetorical analysis SOAPS assignment.

-- take notes on the basic elements of transcendentalism.

-- read aloud the poem, "The Rhodora" by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

-- discuss the transcendental ideas that emerge from the poem.


Lesson 3:

Students will be able to --

-- engage in a rhetorical analysis of the Declaration of Independence.

-- review the elements of argumentation and rhetorical appeals.

 

Lesson 4:

Students will be able to --

-- engage in a close reading/discussion of "Self-Reliance" by Emerson. The students will focus on the ideas in the text that shape American transcendentalism. 

-- understand the short argument paper assignment in response to "Self-Reliance."


Lesson 5:

Students will be able to --

-- read aloud the poem, "Conscience" by Henry David Thoreau.

-- discuss the transcendental ideas that emerge from the poem.

-- engage in a close reading/discussion of "Civil Disobedience" by Thoreau. The students will focus on the ideas in the text that shape American transcendentalism.

 

Lesson 6:

Students will be able to --

-- read aloud the poem, "Song of Myself 1" by Walt Whitman.

-- discuss the transcendental ideas that emerge from the poem.

-- understand the short argument paper assignment in response to  "Civil Disobedience."


Lesson 7:

Students will be able to --

-- begin reading aloud "Battle Royal" from Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.

 

Lesson 8:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss the remainder of "Battle Royal."

-- engage in a rhetorical analysis of "Battle Royal" in regards to the Marking Period Two essential question.

 

Lesson 9:

Students will be able to --

-- begin screening The Great Debaters by Denzel Washington as a connection to the Marking Period Two essential question and as a model for debate (argumentation).

 

Lesson 10:

Students will be able to --

-- continue screening The Great Debaters


Lesson 11:

Students will be able to --

-- finish screening The Great Debaters

 

Lesson 12:

Students will be able to --

-- engage in individual forensic exercises to practice their Poetry Out Loud recitations.

-- work in small groups to practice and critique each other's poetry presentations. 


Lesson 13:

Students will be able to --

-- create a character list for The Great Debaters

 -- write a journal entry about the struggles each character had to overcome in order to meet his or her goals and the unique talents each characters possessed to empower the community.

 -- engage in a Socratic discussion about The Great Debaters

 

Lesson 14:

 Students will be able to --

 -- engage in a Socratic discussion about "Battle Royal" by Ralph Ellison. 

  

Lesson 15:

Students will be able to --

-- understand the requirements of the debate/argument essay.

-- develop a list of possible resolutions for the debate/argument essay. 


Lesson 16:

Students will be able to --

-- present their Poetry Out Loud selections. 

 
Lesson 17:
Students will be able to -- 
-- select their debate partners.
-- select their debate opponents.
-- draft possible debate resolutions.
-- share their debate resolution drafts with the class, as it is typed on the LCD screen, and solicit advice from the class.
 
Lesson 18:
Students will be able to -- 
-- develop a debate schedule.
-- understand the Moby-Dick reading syllabus.
-- "Song of Myself 1" by Walt Whitman.
-- answer the guided reading questions. 
-- engage in an explication of the poem.
 
Lesson 19:
Students will be able to -- 
-- navigate the online databases in the computer lab to research articles written about their debate topics.
-- develop three contentions.
-- continue refining the language of their resolutions.
-- begin drafting their constructive speeches. 
 
Lesson 20:
Students will be able to --
-- share their debate contentions with their opponents.
-- develop questions for crossfires.
-- continue navigating the online databases for counter-evidence.
-- begin drafting their rebuttal speeches.
  
Lesson 21:
Students will be able to -- 
-- watch sections of a debate round on nfltv.org.
-- discuss their observations. 
-- practice flowing/note-taking for their debates. 
-- engage in a practice round of their debates. 
 
Lesson 22: 
Students will be able to -- 
-- present their debates to the class. 
-- flow the debate being presented. 
-- discuss the debate. 
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.
 
Lesson 23: 
Students will be able to -- 
-- present their debates to the class. 
-- flow the debate being presented. 
-- discuss the debate. 
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.
 
Lesson 24:
Students will be able to --
-- present their debates to the class. 
-- flow the debate being presented. 
-- discuss the debate. 
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.
 
Lesson 25:
Students will be able to --
-- present their debates to the class. 
-- flow the debate being presented. 
-- discuss the debate. 
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.
 
Lesson 26:
Students will be able to --
-- present their debates to the class. 
-- flow the debate being presented. 
-- discuss the debate. 
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.
 
Lesson 27:
Students will be able to --
-- present their debates to the class. 
-- flow the debate being presented. 
-- discuss the debate. 
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.
 
Lesson 28:
Students will be able to --
-- take notes on the Ishmael biblical allusion. 
-- discuss the Moby-Dick, Chapters 1-15, study questions in cooperative groups.
-- For ten minutes, the students will accomplish the following tasks:
a.  Discuss the answers to their group’s assigned questions.
b.  Find relevant quotes in the text that support their responses.  They must provide the chapter and page number(s).
--   Each group will present their assigned questions and answers to the class.  Each group member must contribute to the preparation and presentation. 

Lesson 29: 

Students will be able to --
-- understand the requirements of the Marking Period Two synthesis writing assessment.
-- discuss/review essay structure options.
 
Lesson 30:
Students will be able to --
-- begin watching Erin Brockovich as a preview/connection to the Marking Period Three essential question and research paper focal writing assignment. 
 
Lesson 31:
Students will be able to --
-- continue screening Erin Brockovich.
 
Lesson 32:
Students will be able to --
-- finish screening Erin Brockovich.
 
Lesson 33:
Students will be able to --
-- take the Marking Period Two synthesis writing assessment.
 

MARKING PERIOD THREE ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What makes a good citizen?

About Essential Questions

1.The qualities of a good citizen are defined by the government’s laws.

2.A good citizen is obligated to other citizens.

3.Being a good citizen may differ from being a good member of a family, a neighborhood, a worker, and a member of society.

4.Good citizenship is not limited to those officially recognized as citizens of the United States.

5.Good citizens may sacrifice individual needs for the good of society.

 

Lesson 1:
Students will be able to --
-- submit the Erin Brockovich questions.
-- independently read Moby-Dick, Chapters 16-19.
-- take notes on important passages regarding Ishmael's response to the difference faith traditions represented on the Pequod.
 
Lesson 2:
Students will be able to --
-- review the gender and ethics questions regarding Erin Brockovich.
-- tie Erin Brockovich to the Marking Period Three essential question. 
  
Lesson 3:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss the structure of the Pequod, the roles of Captains Bildad and Peleg, and mystery of Captain Ahab.
 
Lesson 4:
Students will be able to --
-- review the values that epitomize the Puritanesque and the Whitmanesque respectively.
-- write a twenty-minute, on-demand, body paragraph in response to the following prompt:
How would you characterize the first half of Moby-Dick: Puritanesque or Whitmanesque?  Embed and quote and parenthetical citation in MLA format.  Provide a claim, evidence, and warrant. 
 
Lesson 5:
Students will be able to --
-- briefly discuss the overview of the HSPA and the information booklets provided by the State.
-- discuss the Queequeg's tomahawk-pipe, Pequod's preparations prior to setting sail, the absence of Captain Ahab, the advice of Captain Bildad, and the hierarchy on the ship. 
-- screen the introduction of the Moby-Dick film, starring Gregory Peck, if time permits.
 
Lesson 6:
Students will be able to --
-- independently read Moby-Dick, Chapters 24-25.  
-- screen the Monstro whale chase scene in Disney's Pinocchio to visualize the monstrosity of a whale.
-- Respond to the following journal writing prompt: What elements of the Pinocchio film clip emphasize human weakness in the face of nature?
-- view the painting of Captain Ahab.
-- Respond to the following journal writing prompt: How does this portrait of Ahab compare with your mental image of him?

Lesson 7:

Students will be able to --
-- engage in cooperative group work to explore, prepare, and present the following questions or prompts:
a.  What do Ahab’s comments suggest about the value of money compared with great desire?
b.  What important details in his environment does Ahab fail to notice?
c.  What is Ahab’s symbolic purpose in having his harpooners drink from their weapons?
d.  What is Moby Dick about, other than the hunt for a whale?
e.  Discuss the representation of humanity’s relationship with the natural world, particularly the juxtaposition of life on the land and life at sea.
 
Lesson 8:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss Herman Melville's possible reasons for creating the title, Moby Dick orThe Whale.
-- discuss the reasons behind Melville including the translations and etymologies of the word "whale."
-- generate a list of literary works with whale references.
-- generate a list of literary works that involve sea voyages.
-- generate a list of mystical bodies of water.
 
Lesson 9:
Students will be able to -- 
-- take notes and have a discussion on archetypes in Moby-Dick.
-- examine a picture of Moby-Dick, and write a journal entry in response to the following prompts:
•Do you think modern readers react with fear and awe to the image of a whale?  Explain.
•Does this illustration seem like a realistic rendering of an actual situation?  Explain.
-- engage in a class discussion regarding their observations. 
 
Lesson 10:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss their homework (Moby-Dick literary analysis questions) with elbow partners.
-- make sure their answers are well-developed and supported with quotes from the novel.
a.  What does the wind symbolize to Ahab?
b.  What symbolic meaning do you find in the comparison between Ahab and the mast?
c.  What symbolic meaning is suggested by the description of the whale’s behavior as he breaks the water’s surface?
d.  What symbolic connection between his own body and the boat does Ahab seem to feel?
e.  What is symbolized by the red flag streaming out from Tashtego?
-- present their responses to the class. 
 
Lesson 11:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss the format and expectations of the forthcoming Moby-Dick novel test. 
-- take notes and have a discussion on epistemology in Moby-Dick.
 
Lesson 12:
Students will be able to --
-- take the Moby-Dick final assessment.
 
Lesson 13:
Students will be able to --
-- understand the requirements of the I-search paper.
-- begin brainstorming preliminary topics. 
 
Lesson 14:
Students will be able to --
-- silently read the excerpt from Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe in connection to the Marking Period Three essential question.
-- independently answer the guided reading questions.
-- discuss the answers as a class. 
 
Lesson 15:
Students will be able to --
-- work on their I-search papers in the computer lab.
-- engage in mini individual writing conferences with their teacher. 
 
Lesson 16:
Students will be able to --
-- individually complete the Hamlet anticipation guide.
-- discuss the Hamlet anticipation guide as a class.
-- understand the families and basic relationships in Hamlet by William Shakespeare as they begin their work on the play.
-- begin acting out Hamlet, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes. 
 
Lesson 17:
Students will be able to -- 
-- finish independently reading Hamlet, 1.2.
-- discuss the back-story of Hamlet.
-- discuss Hamlet's relationships with Claudius/Gertrude and Horatio, respectively.
-- discuss Denmark's relationship with Norway/Young Fortinbras.
 
Lesson 18:
Students will be able to --
-- independently read Hamlet, 1.3-1.5.
-- discuss the family that consists of Polonius, Laertes, and Ophelia.
-- discuss Polonius's advice to Laertes.
-- discuss Polonius's conversation with Ophelia about Hamlet.
-- discuss Hamlet's encounter with the Ghost.
 
Lesson 19:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check on Hamlet, Act One. 
-- silently read "Letter from Birmingham Jail" by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
-- answer the guided reading questions.
-- screen the Hamlet film, starring Mel Gibson, to reinforce and visualize the play. 
 
Lesson 20:
Students will be able to --
-- review the questions for "Letter from Birmingham Jail."
-- discuss Hamlet's relationship with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.
-- discuss characters' suspicions of Hamlet's madness.
-- discuss Hamlet's relationship with Polonius. 
 
Lesson 21:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check on Hamlet, Act Two. 
-- discuss Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia. 
-- discuss the "play within the play."
 
Lesson 22:
Students will be able to --
-- work on their I-search papers in the computer lab.
-- engage in mini individual writing conferences with their teacher.
-- explore the online databases for useful articles.
 
Lesson 23:
Students will be able to --

•Engage in a close reading of Hamlet’s “To be, or not to be...” soliloquy.

•Investigate Hamlet’s range of emotions that stem from his psychological turmoil.

•Implement stage directions and choreography to enhance the reading of the text and to decipher language.

•Evaluate Hamlet’s profound “before and after” or transformation as a character.

-- write a journal entry responding to the following prompts:

Think about the last few days.

•What successes have you had?

•Think about the things that were not successful for you, the things that made you angry, frustrated, sad, etc.

Lesson 24:

Students will be able to --
-- discuss Hamlet's conversation with Gertrude.
-- screen the Hamlet film, starring Mel Gibson, to reinforce and visualize the play.
 
Lesson 25:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss the remainder of Hamlet, Act Three.
-- continue screening the Hamlet film, starring Kenneth Branagh, to reinforce and visualize the reading.

 

 

Lesson 26:

Students will be able to --
-- act out Hamlet, Act 4, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes. 

 

 

Lesson 27:
Students will be able to --
-- continue acting out Hamlet, Act 4, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes.
-- continue screening the Hamlet film, starring Kenneth Branagh, to reinforce and visualize the reading.

 

 

Lesson 28:
Students will be able to --
-- act out key scenes of Hamlet, Act 5, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
-- discuss any redemptive and hopeful elements that emerge from the destruction of Hamlet, Act 5. 

 

 

Lesson 29:
Students will be able to --
-- continue acting out Hamlet, Act 5, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes.
-- continue screening the Hamlet film, starring Kenneth Branagh, to reinforce and visualize the reading. 
 
Lesson 30:
Students will be able to --
-- silently read excerpts from "Letter from Birmingham Jail" by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
-- answer the guided reading questions.
-- engage in a class discussion about Dr. King's letter in connection with the Marking Period Three essential question. 
 
Lesson 31:
Students will be able to --
-- present their I-search papers to the class.
 
Lesson 32:
Students will be able to --
-- finish screening the Hamlet film to reinforce and visualize the play.
-- review for the Hamlet final assessment.
 
Lesson 33:
Students will be able to --
-- take the Hamlet final assessment.
 

Unit 4: Ideal Relationships 

Overarching Essential Question (grades 9-12): What evokes emotional responses? 

Grade11 Essential Question: What makes something beautiful? (What moves us? How do authors/artists create beauty in their readers?)

Grade Level Specific Understandings:

About Essential Questions

1.     Authors/artists use a variety of techniques to create beauty in their work such as: deliberate adherence to or deviation from structure/conventions/form, evoking mood/feeling/emotion from viewer of text, or capturing a moment.

2.     Beauty is subjective and varies among individuals, cultures, gender, social class, and age groups.

3.     There are various physical and emotional connections and responses to beauty.

4.     The experience of reading beautiful writing differs from viewing beauty in other art forms. 

 
Lesson 1: 
Students will be able to --
-- screen the Lacoste eightieth anniversary commercial to begin discussing the elements that define an age. 
-- discuss the concept of postmodernism as an introduction to Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut.  Topics include progress, innovation, and metanarratives.
-- begin reading aloud Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 1, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 
Lesson 2:
Students will be able to --
-- screen the first ten minutes of the documentary, Firestorm Over Dresden, to understand the profound "before and after" that occurred in Dresden during World War II, in particular the destruction of the art, architecture, and culture.
-- discuss their observation of the documentary excerpt.
-- explicate the poem, "The Unknown Citizen" by W. H. Auden.
-- finish discussing Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 1 (POWs, Mary O'Hare, Lot's wife). 
 
Lesson 3:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss the postmodern cartoon.
-- screen the Exploration Films brief documentary about postmodernism to reinforce previous discussions about this literary/philosophical movement.
-- discuss the postmodern qualities of Slaughterhouse-Five and why Kurt Vonnegut chose to write about his experience in this manner.
-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 2 (Billy Pilgrim, Tralfamadorian abduction, Ilium).
 
Lesson 4:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 3 (the POW experience in particular).
 
Lesson 5:
Students will be able to --
-- read aloud and explicate the poem, "Design" by Robert Frost.
-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 4. 
 
Lesson 6:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss "Winter Dreams" by F. Scott Fitzgerald.
-- begin reading aloud Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 5, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 
Lesson 7:
Students will be able to --
-- Discuss "Seeing" by Annie Dillard.
-- continue reading Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 5, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 
Lesson 8: 
Students will be able to --
-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 6
-- begin screening the film, Slaughterhouse-Five, to reinforce and visualize the text.
 
Lesson 9:
Students will be able to -- 
-- explore Vonnegut's ideologies and actions: pacifism, determinism, free will/choice, sadism, patriotism, chauvenism/jingoism, fascism, revenge, revisionism, materialism, conservatism.
-- students must provide textual evidence to support how Billy responds to and how society is affected by these ideologies. 
 
Lesson 10:
Students will be able to --
-- explore Vonnegut's expressionism (associations and exaggerations) as a means to address the issues in Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 7.
 
Lesson 11:
Students will be able to --
-- draw a picture of a given scene in Slaughterhouse-Five; describe the characters, the setting (place and time), and other elements in the picture to the class; and to lead the class in a discussion of what the scene means.
-- place all the pictures side-by-side at the end of each presentation.
-- infer what the common element is.
The scenes are:
1.  The Americans in the slaughterhouse
2.  Kilgore Trout and newspaper delivery
3.  "The Money Tree"
4.  Anniversary party
5.  The Febs and "Eleven Cent Cotton"
6.  Billy and Robert
7.  Remembering Dresden
8.  Billy and Montana
9.  The march
10.  Americans at the German Inn 
 
Lesson 12:
Students will be able to --
-- finish the previous day's group work.
-- present their pictures to the class.
-- write a brief journal entry about what they think the pictures have in common.
-- discuss their observations re: the connections between the pictures.
 
Lesson 13:
Students will be able to --
-- Discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapters 9 and 10. 
 
Lesson 14:
Students will be able to --
-- continue screening the film, Slaughterhouse-Five, to reinforce and visualize the novel.
 
Lesson 15:
Students will be able to --
-- finish screening the film, Slaughterhouse-Five, to reinforce and visualize the novel.
  
Lesson 16: 
Students will be able to --
-- write an in-class, on-demand literary essay on Slaughterhouse-Five.
 
Lesson 17:
Students will be able to -- 
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter One. 
 
Lesson 18:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Two.
 
Lesson 19:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Three.
 
Lesson 20:
Students will be able to -- 
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Four.
  
Lesson 21:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check quiz on The Great Gatsby
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Five.
 
Lesson 22:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Six.
  
Lesson 23:
Students will be able to --
-- engage in a Socratic Seminar involving The Great Gatsby in connection to the texts and themes covered during the year.
 
Lesson 24:
Students will be able to --
-- finish engaging in a Socratic Seminar involving The Great Gatsby in connection to the texts and themes covered during the year.
  
Lesson 25:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Seven.
 
Lesson 26:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Eight.
 
Lesson 27:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Nine.
 
Lesson 28:
Students will be able to --
-- continue screening The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.
 
Lesson 29:
Students will be able to --
-- continue screen The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.
 
Lesson 30:
Students will be able to --
-- continue screening The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.
 
Lesson 31:
Students will be able to --
-- finish screening The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.
-- discuss the extent to which Baz Luhrmann's film maintained the integrity of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel. 
 
Lesson 32:
Students will be able to --
-- review for the final exam.
 
Lesson 33:
Students will be able to --
-- review for the final exam. 
Last Modified on June 15, 2014