2014-2015 ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What values define America?
 
MARKING PERIOD 1 ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How do our time and place affect our thinking?
 
Grade Level Specific Understandings:

       About Essential Questions

  1. The way we view the world may change as our individual contexts change.
  2. Time and place influence both the reader and writer’s beliefs.
  3. Time and place affect behavior and action in both art and life.
  4. All art or literature occurs in multiple contexts, including the physical, the temporal, and the psycho-social dimensions.  (No art occurs in a vacuum.)
  5. Learning about different historical and geographical contexts help us understand ideologies that may be different from our own.
New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Language Arts Literacy 
  • 3.1.12 E. Reading Strategies (before, during, and after reading)
1. Identify, assess, and apply personal reading strategies that were most effective in previous learning from
a variety of texts.
2. Practice visualizing techniques before, during, and after reading to aid in comprehension. 
3. Judge the most effective graphic organizers to use with various text types for memory retention and
monitoring comprehension.
 
  • 3.5.12 C. Living with Media
1. Use print and electronic media texts to explore human relationships, new ideas, and aspects of culture
(e.g., racial prejudice, dating, marriage, family, and social institutions).
2. Determine influences on news media based on existing political, historical, economical, and social
contexts (e.g., importance of audience feedback).
3. Recognize that creators of media and performances use a number of forms, techniques, and
technologies to convey their messages.

Lesson 1:

Students will be able to --

·        Receive their seating assignments.

·        Review the course syllabus.

·        Examine the components of the teacher page.

·        Understand the requirements of the summer reading assessment.

·        View the Malala Yousafzai BBC video clip.

·        Reflection: What are three things that struck you about Malala Yousafzai's experience?  Aside from education, list three VALUES (principles, standards, judgments of what is important) that Yousafzai defends.

·        Engage in a whip discussion to briefly share either what struck them or the value Yousafzai defends.

·        Quick Write: List 3-5 values that are unique to the United States.

·        Share their American values, and narrow the list to three values. Partners should be prepared to develop ONE value and share it with the class.

 
Lesson 2:
Students will be able to --

DO NOW:

a.  Take out homework for submission.

b.  Answer "Upon the Burning of Our House" questions.

·  Review "Upon the Burning of Our House" questions and connect the concepts of the poem back to the Marking Period 1 essential question.

·  Underline the most important aspect of their paragraphs (homework), and share their values with the class.

·  Engage in a meditation exercise re: Carl Jung's concept of the collective unconscious to better understand the meaning of symbols.

Lesson 3:
Students will be able to --
-- take the summer reading assessment.

Lesson 4:

Students will be able to --
-- take notes and engage in a discussion on allegory.
-- understand the allegory and symbolism of early New England gravestones as a model for reading "Young Goodman Brown."
-- interpret two early New England gravestones.
-- sketch a gravestone for Young Goodman Brown that includes an appropriate epitaph and symbols.

Lesson 5:

Students will be able to --
-- engage in a whip discussion to share their Young Goodman Brown epitaphs and symbols.
-- work in cooperative groups on the allegorical interpretations of the characters, objects, settings, and actions in "Young Goodman Brown."
-- begin group presentations.

Lesson 6:

Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check quiz on The Scarlet Letter, Chapters 1-4.
-- finish the "Young Goodman Brown" group presentations.
-- discuss and take notes on American Romanticism to contextualize The Scarlet Letter.
-- screen the "Sandwich Board Kids" segment of ABC's "What Would You Do?" as a connection to The Scarlet Letter.
-- discuss the crime and punishment represented in the video and compare it to Hester Prynne's predicament.
 
Lesson 7:
Students will be able to --
-- describe the relationship between Hester Prynne and Roger Chillingworth up to and including Chapter 6 (as a Do Now/journal).
-- discuss their journal writing.
-- read aloud and discuss specific passages in Chapter 3: "The Recognition" to expound on the meaning of Chillingworth's transformation.
 
Lesson 8: 
Students will be able to --
-- write three images and one value represented in Rev. Jonathan Edwards's "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God."
-- Examine the cover art of The Scarlet Letter and discuss the insight it adds to our knowledge of the text.
-- compare Hester Knocking at Mercy's Door to Christ Knocking at Heart's Door.
-- begin screening Dr. Ralph Greene's reenactment of Rev. Jonathan Edwards's "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God."
-- observe the forensic elements of Dr. Greene's performance and assess its effectiveness in delivering the message of the sermon.
 
Lesson 9:
Students will be able to --
-- write a journal entry that responds to the following prompt (Do Now):
> Describe the Pearl's personality.
> Describe Pearl's relationship with:
a.  Hester
b.  Chillingworth
c.  Gov. Bellingham
d.  Rev. Dimmesdale
-- discuss their journal writing.
-- examine the Madonna and Child painting by Raphael as a model used by Nathaniel Hawthorne in describing the relationship between Hester and Pearl (allegory).
 
Lesson 10:
Students will be able to --
-- assess Dimmesdale as a minister. Do Now/Journal: How would Rev. Jonathan Edwards evaluate Dimmesdale as a minister? Refer to passages in the novel and the sermon to support your ideas.
-- discuss their journal writing.
 
Lesson 11:
Students will be able to --
-- write a journal entry on the following topic: Describe the relationship between Dimmesdale and Chillingworth. Provide textual evidence to support your ideas.
-- engage in a whip discussion to share their journal writing.
 
Lesson 12:
Students will be able to --
-- engage in a second reading of The Scarlet Letter, Chapter 13.
-- engage in a literary analysis of Chapter 13, using the "Hawthorne and Hester" handout.
-- work in assigned cooperative groups on the "Hawthorne and Hester" handout.
-- present their group work to the class. 
 
Lesson 13:
Students will be able to -- 
-- finish their "Hawthorne and Hester" group presentations.
-- screen the Scarlet Letter film to reinforce and visualize the novel.
 
Lesson 14:
Students will be able to --
-- understand the requirements of the personal narrative themed autobiography assignment.
-- review the formatting of dialogue.
-- review the difference between active and passive voice. 
-- engage in silent, sustained free-writing to begin the personal narrative themed autobiography assignment. 
 
Lesson 15:
Students will be able to --
-- set up their TurnItIn.com accounts in the computer lab.
-- review how to set up a document in MLA format.
-- write a draft of their personal narrative themed autobiography in the computer lab
-- submit the first page of their personal narrative themed autobiography for preliminary feedback.
 
Lesson 16: 
Students will be able to --
-- engage in mini individual writing conferences with Dr. Sunga re: their personal narrative themed autobiography draft.
-- silently work on a close reading of Dimmesdale's transformation.
 
Lesson 17:
Students will be able to --
-- present their Dimmesdale transformation close readings. 
 
Lesson 18:
Students will be able to -- 
-- understand the requirements of the Socratic Seminar.
-- discuss the different levels of questions on Bloom's Taxonomy as models.
-- work in cooperative groups to create higher-level thinking questions their assigned chapters.
-- begin the Socratic Seminar. 
 
Lesson 19:
Students will be able to --
-- continue the Scarlet Letter (Chapters 16-21) Socratic Seminar.
 
Lesson 20:
Students will be able to --
-- finish  the Scarlet Letter (Chapters 16-21) Socratic Seminar.
-- discuss the overarching issues that emerged from the Socratic Seminar. 
 
Lesson 21:
Students will be able to --
-- understand the requirements of the Spoon River Anthology dramatic monologue project. 
-- juxtapose the three scaffold scenes as a way to put closure to The Scarlet Letter.
-- utilize the graphic organizer to summarize the scenes, gather textual evidence, and draw conclusions.
 
Lesson 22:
Students will be able to --
-- select their Spoon River Anthology monologues. 
-- finish discussing the juxtaposition between the scaffold scenes.
-- screen the Scarlet Letter film, if time permits. 
 
Lesson 23:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Scarlet Letter, Chapters 22-24. 
-- review the study guide for the Scarlet Letter final test.
-- practice their Spoon River Anthology monologues. 
 
Lesson 24:
Students will be able to --
-- continue screening the Scarlet Letter film to reinforce and visualize the novel.
 
Lesson 25:
Students will be able to -- 
-- take the final test on The Scarlet Letter (summative assessment).
 
Lesson 26:
Students will be able to --
-- write a journal entry that connects "Half-Hanged Mary" to The Scarlet Letter and explicates a stanza they find shocking or intriguing.
-- discuss "Half-Hanged Mary" in conversation with the Puritan-themed texts that they have read.
 
Lesson 27:
Students will be able to --
-- takes notes and engage in a discussion on the Puritans and the Salem Witch Trials as a context for reading The Crucible.
-- engage in a close reading of Thompkins H. Matteson's painting, The Trial of George Jacobs, August 5, 1692.
-- discuss what the details/action in the painting suggest about the nature of a "crucible" and the mass hysteria that swept Salem during the Salem Witch Trials.
 
Lesson 28:
Students will be able to --
-- screen the introduction of the Crucible film to further discuss the onset of mass hysteria in Salem.
-- take notes on their observations and discuss their insights.
-- discuss/brainstorm what they know about terrorism.
-- understand the requirements of the "Acts of Terror" group work.
-- engage in group work in preparation for oral presentations about the acts of terror that have occurred in America.
 
Lesson 29:
Students will be able to --
-- continue the group work in preparation for oral presentations about the acts of terror that have occurred in America.
 
Lesson 30:
Students will be able to --
-- present their "Acts of Terror" group work.
-- create a US Terrorism timeline on the bulletin board to help them visually connect the events.
-- write a concise definition of terrorism on an index card, based on the presentations.
-- focus on how the Salem Witch Trials can be considered an event of terror.
-- begin reading aloud The Crucible, Act One, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 
Lesson 31:
Students will be able to --
-- screen the introductory scene of the Crucible film, starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder.
-- identify the central conflict using evidence from the film.
-- discuss their observations as a whole class.
-- discuss the causes of mass hysteria and scapegoating.
 
Lesson 32:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss the first half of The Crucible, Act One.
-- continue screening the film to reinforce and visualize the text.
 
Lesson 33:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check quiz on The Crucible, Act One.
-- discuss the American values at stake in The Crucible, Act One.
-- begin acting out The Crucible, Act Two, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.
 

MARKING PERIOD TWO ESSENTIAL QUESTION: Is "liberty and justice" attainable for all? How can we balance everyone's rights?

Grade Level Specific Understandings:

About Essential Questions

  1. There are different notions of freedom, liberty, and justice.
  2. Culture defines liberty and justice.
  3. Authors respond to and are informed by notions about liberty and justice in their works.
  4. Nations are governed by notions of liberty and justice.
  5. There is an American tradition and heritage that emphasizes liberty and justice.

CCR/Grade Specific Standards:

Reading Standards for Literature

R.CCR.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

R.CCR.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

R.CCR.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

RL.11-12.10 By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 11–CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Writing Standards

W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.11-12.1a Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

W.11-12.1b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

W.11-12.1c Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

W.11-12.1e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. 

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL.11-12.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

SL.11-12.1c Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

SL.11-12.1d Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

SL.11-12.2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.

Lesson 1:

Students will be able to --
-- discuss McCarthyism, hysteria, tragedy, and staging to expound on the critical issues espoused in The Crucible.  
 
Lesson 2:
Students will be able to --
-- continue acting out The Crucible, Act Two, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes. 
 
Lesson 3:
Students will be able to --
-- take a reading check quiz on The Crucible, Act Two.
-- begin acting out The Crucible, Act Three, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes. 
 
Lesson 4:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Crucible, Act Three.
-- begin acting out The Crucible, Act Four, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes. 
 
Lesson 5:
Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Crucible, Act Four.
-- discuss screen key scenes in the film to reinforce and visualize the text.
 
Lesson 6:
Students will be able to --
-- take the final test on The Crucible
 
Lesson 7:
Students will be able to --
-- write a journal entry about what it means to "transcend" something."
-- discuss their journal entries, while noting the salient points on the blackboard.
-- discuss the transcendental concepts of Tao or the Over-soul.
-- read the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu, Poems 1 and 23.
-- discuss the categories that emerge from the Tao Te Ching in developing a working definition of transcendentalism.
-- screen selected excerpts from the film, Seven Years in Tibet, to reinforce the concepts that inspired Emerson and Thoreau's development of American transcendentalism. The students must note specific scenes that reflect the unique aspects of Tibetan values.
-- discuss their observations.
 
Lesson 8:
Students will be able to --
-- understand the requirements of the Declaration of Independence rhetorical analysis SOAPS assignment.
-- take notes on the basic elements of transcendentalism.
-- read aloud the poem, "The Rhodora" by Ralph Waldo Emerson.
-- discuss the transcendental ideas that emerge from the poem.
 
Lesson 9:
Students will be able to --
-- begin screening The Great Debaters by Denzel Washington as a connection to the Marking Period Two essential question and as a model for debate (argumentation).
 
Lesson 10:
Students will be able to --
-- continue screening The Great Debaters
 
Lesson 11:
Students will be able to --
-- finish screening The Great Debaters
 
Lesson 12:
Students will be able to --
-- create a character list for The Great Debaters.
-- write a journal entry about the struggles each character had to overcome in order to meet his or her goals and the unique talents each characters possessed to empower the community.
 
Lesson 13:
Students will be able to --
-- understand the requirements of the debate/argument essay.
-- develop a list of possible resolutions for the debate/argument essay. 
 
Lesson 14:
Students will be able to --
-- select their debate partners.
-- select their debate opponents.
-- draft possible debate resolutions.
-- share their debate resolution drafts with the class, as it is typed on the LCD screen, and solicit advice from the class.
 
Lesson 15:
Students will be able to --
-- navigate the online databases. using the Lenovo ThinkPads, to research articles written about their debate topics.
-- develop three contentions.
-- continue refining the language of their resolutions.
-- begin drafting their constructive speeches. 
 
Lesson 16:
Students will be able to --
-- share their debate contentions with their opponents.
-- develop questions for crossfires.
-- continue navigating the online databases for counter-evidence.
-- begin drafting their rebuttal speeches.
 
Lesson 17:
Students will be able to –
-- watch sections of a debate round on speechanddebate.org.
-- discuss their observations.
-- practice flowing/note-taking for their debates.
-- engage in a practice round of their debates. 

Lesson 18:

Students will be able to –
-- present their debates to the class.
-- flow the debate being presented.
-- discuss the debate.
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.

Lesson 19:

Students will be able to –
-- present their debates to the class.
-- flow the debate being presented.
-- discuss the debate.
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.

Lesson 20:

Students will be able to –
-- present their debates to the class.
-- flow the debate being presented.
-- discuss the debate.
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.

Lesson 21:

Students will be able to –
-- present their debates to the class.
-- flow the debate being presented.
-- discuss the debate.
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.

Lesson 22:

Students will be able to –
-- present their debates to the class.
-- flow the debate being presented.
-- discuss the debate.
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.

Lesson 23:

Students will be able to –
-- present their debates to the class.
-- flow the debate being presented.
-- discuss the debate.
-- vote on the winner of the debate round.

Lesson 24:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter One. 

 

Lesson 25:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Two.

 

Lesson 26:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Three.

 

Lesson 27:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Four.

 

Lesson 28:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Five.

 

Lesson 29:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Six.

 

Lesson 30:

Students will be able to –

·         review the requirements of the Marking Period Two synthesis essay.

·         -- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Seven.

 

Lesson 31:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Eight.

 

Lesson 32:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Nine.

 

Lesson 33:

Students will be able to –

·         write the in-class Marking Period Two synthesis essay.

 

MARKING PERIOD THREE ESSENTIAL QUESTION: What makes a good citizen?

About Essential Questions

1.The qualities of a good citizen are defined by the government’s laws.

2.A good citizen is obligated to other citizens.

3.Being a good citizen may differ from being a good member of a family, a neighborhood, a worker, and a member of society.

4.Good citizenship is not limited to those officially recognized as citizens of the United States.

5.Good citizens may sacrifice individual needs for the good of society.

CCR/Grade Specific Standards:

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RL.11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

RL.11-12.6 Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).

RL.11-12.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

RL.11-12.9 Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

Writing Standards

W.11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.11-12.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

W.11-12.9 Draw evidence form literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Lesson 1:

Students will be able to -- 

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter One. 

 

Lesson 2:

Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Two.
 

Lesson 3:

Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Three.
 

Lesson 4:

Students will be able to -- 

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Four.
  

Lesson 5:

Students will be able to --

-- take a reading check quiz on The Great Gatsby

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Five.
 

Lesson 6:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Six.

Lesson 7:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Seven.

 

Lesson 8:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Eight.

 

 

 

 

Lesson 9:

Students will be able to --
-- discuss The Great Gatsby, Chapter Nine.
 

Lesson 10:

Students will be able to --

-- take the summative assessment on The Great Gatsby.

 

Lesson 11:

Students will be able to --
-- continue screening The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.

 

Lesson 12:

Students will be able to --
-- continue screen The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.
 

Lesson 13:

Students will be able to --

-- continue screening The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.

 

Lesson 14:

Students will be able to --
-- finish screening The Great Gatsby, starring Leonardo DiCaprio.

-- discuss the extent to which Baz Luhrmann's film maintained the integrity of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel. 

Lesson 15:

Students will be able to --

-- present their Great Gatsby film critique written reflections.

 

Lesson 16:

Students will be able to --

 -- silently read "Letter from Birmingham Jail" by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

-- answer the guided reading questions.

-- discuss "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Lesson 17:

Students will be able to --

-- silently read the excerpt from Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe in connection to the Marking Period Three essential question.

-- independently answer the guided reading questions.

-- discuss the answers as a class. 

Lesson 18:

Students will be able to --

-- explicate the poem, "The Unknown Citizen" by W. H. Auden.

-- use the provided graphic organizer to explore the poem’s themes of patriotism, science and technology, and alienation.

 

Lesson 19:

Students will be able to –

-- engage in a close reading/discussion of "Civil Disobedience" by Thoreau. The students will focus on the ideas in the text that shape American transcendentalism.

 

Lesson 20:

Students will be able to --

-- individually complete the Hamlet anticipation guide.

-- discuss the Hamlet anticipation guide as a class.

-- understand the families and basic relationships in Hamlet by William Shakespeare as they begin their work on the play.

-- begin acting out Hamlet, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes. 

 

Lesson 21:

Students will be able to --

-- understand the requirements of the I-search paper.

-- begin brainstorming preliminary topics. 

 

Lesson 22:

Students will be able to --

-- begin acting out Hamlet, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes. 

 

Lesson 23:

Students will be able to --

Students will be able to -- 

-- finish independently reading Hamlet, 1.2.

-- discuss the back-story of Hamlet.

-- discuss Hamlet's relationships with Claudius/Gertrude and Horatio, respectively.

-- discuss Denmark's relationship with Norway/Young Fortinbras.

 

Lesson 24:

Students will be able to --

-- independently read Hamlet, 1.3-1.5.

-- discuss the family that consists of Polonius, Laertes, and Ophelia.

-- discuss Polonius's advice to Laertes.

-- discuss Polonius's conversation with Ophelia about Hamlet.

-- discuss Hamlet's encounter with the Ghost.

Lesson 25:

Students will be able to --

-- take a reading check on Hamlet, Act One. 

-- silently read "Letter from Birmingham Jail" by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

-- answer the guided reading questions.

-- screen the Hamlet film, starring Mel Gibson, to reinforce and visualize the play. 

 

Lesson 26:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss Hamlet's relationship with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

-- discuss characters' suspicions of Hamlet's madness.

-- discuss Hamlet's relationship with Polonius. 

 

Lesson 27:

Students will be able to –

·         Understand the requirements of the I-search annotated bibliography.

·         Review a model of an annotated bibliography.

·         Begin working on their annotated bibliographies.

 

Lesson 28:

Students will be able to --

·         Complete their I-search annotated bibliographies.

·         Submit their I-search annotated bibliographies to turnitin.com.

 

Lesson 29:

Students will be able to --

·         Review and MLA in-text citations and models.

·         Continue working on their I-search papers in the computer lab.

 

Lesson 30:

Students will be able to --

-- work on their I-search papers in the computer lab.

-- engage in mini individual writing conferences with their teacher. 

 

Lesson 31:

Students will be able to --

-- work on their I-search papers in the computer lab.

-- engage in mini individual writing conferences with their teacher.

-- explore the online databases for useful articles.

Lesson 32:

Students will be able to --

·     Engage in a rhetorical analysis of Hamlet’s “To be, or not to be...” soliloquy.

·     Investigate Hamlet’s range of emotions that stem from his psychological turmoil.

·     Implement stage directions and choreography to enhance the reading of the soliloquy and to decipher language.

·     Evaluate Hamlet’s profound “before and after” or transformation as a character.

 

Lesson 33:

Students will be able to –

·         Finish presenting their “To be, or not to be…” rhetorical analyses to the class.

·         continue screening the Hamlet film, starring Mel Gibson, to reinforce and visualize the play.

Unit 4: Ideal Relationships

 

Overarching Essential Question (grades 9-12): What evokes emotional responses?

 

Grade11 Essential Question: What makes something beautiful? (What moves us? How do authors/artists create beauty in their readers?)

 

Grade Level Specific Understandings:

 

About Essential Questions

1.        Authors/artists use a variety of techniques to create beauty in their work such as: deliberate adherence to or deviation from structure/conventions/form, evoking mood/feeling/emotion from viewer of text, or capturing a moment.

2.        Beauty is subjective and varies among individuals, cultures, gender, social class, and age groups.

3.        There are various physical and emotional connections and responses to beauty.

4.        The experience of reading beautiful writing differs from viewing beauty in other art forms.

CCR/Grade Specific Standards:

Reading Standards for Literature

RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

RL.11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

RL.11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

RL.11-12.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

RL.11-12.5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

RL.11-12.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)

 

Writing Standards

W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

W.11-12.1a Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

W.11-12.1b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level, concerns, values, and possible biases.

W.11-12.1c Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

W.11-12.1d Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.11-12.1e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

W.11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

W.11-12.2a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.11-12.2b Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

W.11-12.2c Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

W.11-12.2d Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.

W.11-12.2e Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

W.11-12.2f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

W.11-12.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)

W.11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1–3 up to and including grades 11–12 on page 54.)

W.11-12.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.

Lesson 1:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss Hamlet's conversation with Gertrude.

-- screen the Hamlet film, starring Mel Gibson, to reinforce and visualize the play.

Lesson 2:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss the remainder of Hamlet, Act Three.

-- continue screening the Hamlet film, starring Kenneth Branagh, to reinforce and visualize the reading.

Lesson 3:

Students will be able to --

-- act out Hamlet, Act 4, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes. 

Lesson 4:

Students will be able to --

-- continue acting out Hamlet, Act 4, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes.

-- continue screening the Hamlet film, starring Kenneth Branagh, to reinforce and visualize the reading.

Lesson 5:

Students will be able to --

-- act out key scenes of Hamlet, Act 5, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.

-- discuss any redemptive and hopeful elements that emerge from the destruction of Hamlet, Act 5. 

 

 

 

Lesson 6:

Students will be able to --

-- continue acting out Hamlet, Act 5, while stopping at critical points in the play to discuss and take notes.

-- continue screening the Hamlet film, starring Kenneth Branagh, to reinforce and visualize the reading. 

Lesson 7:

Students will be able to --

-- finish screening the Hamlet film to reinforce and visualize the play.

-- review for the Hamlet final assessment.

Lesson 8:

Students will be able to --

-- take the Hamlet final summative assessment.

Lesson 9:

Students will be able to –

-- screen the Lacoste eightieth anniversary commercial to begin discussing the elements that define an age. 

-- discuss the concept of postmodernism as an introduction to Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut.  Topics include progress, innovation, and metanarratives.

-- begin reading aloud Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 1, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.

 

 

 

 

Lesson 10:

Students will be able to --

-- screen the first ten minutes of the documentary, Firestorm Over Dresden, to understand the profound "before and after" that occurred in Dresden during World War II, in particular the destruction of the art, architecture, and culture.

-- discuss their observation of the documentary excerpt.

-- finish discussing Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 1 (POWs, Mary O'Hare, Lot's wife). 

Lesson 11:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss the postmodern cartoon.

-- screen the Exploration Films brief documentary about postmodernism to reinforce previous discussions about this literary/philosophical movement.

-- discuss the postmodern qualities of Slaughterhouse-Five and why Kurt Vonnegut chose to write about his experience in this manner.

-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 2 (Billy Pilgrim, Tralfamadorian abduction, Ilium).

Lesson 12:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 3 (the POW experience in particular).

Lesson 13:

Students will be able to --

-- read aloud and explicate the poem, "Design" by Robert Frost.

-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 4. 

Lesson 14:

Students will be able to –

-- discuss "Winter Dreams" by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

-- begin reading aloud Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 5, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.

 

 

Lesson 15:

Students will be able to --

-- Discuss "Seeing" by Annie Dillard.

-- continue reading Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 5, while stopping at critical points in the text to discuss and take notes.

Lesson 16:

Students will be able to --

-- discuss Slaughterhouse-Five, Chapter 6. 

 

 

 

 


 

Last Modified on Thursday at 9:36 AM